Announcements

Summer Institute in American Philosophy June 8-13, 2015 will take place at the University College Dublin. It will feature panels on "Pragmatism and Feminism," "Pragmatism and Critical Theory,""Pragmatist and Eastern Philosophy," and "Pragmatism and Analytic Philosophy." Confirmed keynote speakers include: Robert Brandom (in person) and Hilary Putnam (via Skype). More details coming.

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Summer Institute in American Philosophy

2015 Institute: Dublin, Ireland

ANNOUNCING THE SUMMER INSTITUTE IN AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY (SIAP)
June 8-13, 2015 at the School of Philosophy, University College Dublin, Ireland

?The Reaches of Pragmatism?

Summer Institute in American Philosophy

Call for Submissions and Expressions of Interest

The 2015 Summer Institute in American Philosophy will be held at University College Dublin, Ireland from June 8-13, 2015. This is the first time that the SIAP, organized annually by the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, is being held in Europe. Appropriately, the 2015 Institute will explore the influences, interconnections, and encounters between pragmatism and other philosophical traditions.

General Information

The Summer Institute in American Philosophy is designed for faculty members, early career researchers and advanced graduates in philosophy and related disciplines who are interested in American philosophy in general and Pragmatism and Neo-Pragmatism in particular. Robert Brandom and Hilary Putnam (via skype) will deliver key-note addresses on the theme of the Summer Institute.  The daily program will be centered around plenary panels led by a number of distinguished experts, spanning multiple sessions over two or three days. The panels for this year are on ?Analytic Pragmatism? (Cheryl Misak, Huw Price, and Jim O'Shea), ?Pragmatism and Critical Theory? (Maeve Cooke), ?Feminist Pragmatism? (Marilyn Fisher and Charlene Seigfried), ?Re-Reading Emerson? (Russell B. Goomand), and ?Pragmatism in China?.
There will also be a number of traditional sessions, including paper presentations and works-in-progress meetings.

Further Information

All attendants of the Summer Institute will be awarded a certificate of participation upon request. It is also possible to obtain credits for the module ?American Philosophy: The Reaches of Pragmatism? upon payment of an additional fee and submitting written work. For further information on this option please contact Professor Maria Baghramian ( Maria.Baghramian@ucd.ie)

Registration, Housing, Grants, Program and other information: http://www.american-voice.org/index.php/summer-institute-in-american-philosophy (and check for updates)



2014 Institute

Eugene, OR

Summer Institute in American Philosophy 2013 details are here or email Colin
Koopman;koopman@uoregon.edu.


2013 Institute

Summer Institute in American Philosophy 2013 details are here or email Colin
Koopman;koopman@uoregon.edu.


2012 Institute

The 2012 Summer Institute in American Philosophy at the University of Oregon
July 16-21, 2012 in Eugene, Oregon

For more information on SIAP 2012 please see
<http://pages.uoregon.edu/koopman/siap/siap_2012.html> or email Colin
Koopman <koopman@uoregon.edu>.


2011 Institute

Summer Institute in American Philosophy 2011 details are here or email Colin
Koopman;koopman@uoregon.edu.

The 2011 Summer Institute in American Philosophy at the University of Oregon
July 11-16, 2011 in Eugene, Oregon



2010 Institute

Summer Institute in American Philosophy 2013 details are here or email Colin
Koopman;koopman@uoregon.edu.


2009 Institute

The Summer Institute in American Philosophy is designed for faculty members and advanced graduate and postdoctoral students in philosophy and related disciplines interested in research and study in the American philosophic tradition. The program consists of four seminars focused on central figures and problem areas in the tradition. 

-- ARRIVAL INFORMATION Word .doc

-- Schedule Grid as a Word .doc

-- Master reading list is here.

-- Presenter's readings/lists: Kaag(1, 2);Clandinin(1);Dryden(1, 2, 3);Jensen (1); Musgrave (1); Pratt (1,2) ; Seigfried (1)

Institute Schedule   

Monday, July 13:  Opening Reception (5:00 pm, Carson Hall)
Tuesday, July 14:  Seminars?Rereading William James and Experiencing Education (9:30-5:00, Knight Law School)
Wednesday, July 15: Seminars?Rereading William James and Experiencing Education (9:30-5:00, Knight Law School)
Thursday, July 16:  Works-In-Progress Seminars (8:00 until 11:00) and Keynote Address by John Lachs (11:00, Knight Law School). Special afternoon events include an excursion to the Oregon coast and a tour of local wineries. 
Friday, July 17:  Seminars?Aesthetics and American Feminism (9:30 until 5:00, Knight Law School)
Saturday, July 18: Seminars?Aesthetics and American Feminism (9:30 until 5:00, Knight Law School)  Closing Banquet, 7:00.

Registration and Program Information

The registration form is here.

For more information about Eugene and Lane County, Oregon, see http://www.travellanecounty.org/.  The Oregon Bach Festival runs from June 26 through July 12 (see http://www.oregonbachfestival.com/).  The Oregon Country Fair (in nearby Veneta, Oregon) will be held July 11-13 (see http://www.oregoncountryfair.org/). 

Keynote Address  

This year, John Lachs, Centennial Professor of Philosophy, Vanderbilt University, will give a keynote address titled ?Good Enough.?  Professor Lachs? philosophical interests center on human nature, which leads him into metaphysics, philosophy of mind, political philosophy, and ethics. He has continuing research interests in American philosophy and in German Idealism, along with research and teaching interests in medical and business ethics. Professor Lachs is author of numerous articles and books including In Love with Life (1998) and The Relevance of Philosophy for Life (1995).

Seminars in American Philosophy

Experiencing Education

This session will be devoted to exploring some ways in which experience and education are linked in the American tradition. Professor Musgrave will work with two foci. The first will consider the role of the arts in learning with an emphasis on the work of Jane Addams and John Dewey; the second will involve an exploration of experiential learning using Dewey?s influence on the curriculum and learning environment of Rollins College as a case study.  Professor Anderson will focus on the experience of learning as articulated by several Transcendentalist thinkers and Charles Peirce. The key theme will be the art of receptivity.  Professor Rosiek will explore the difficulty of enacting pedagogical practice grounded in a pragmatic ontology of experience without the support of a pragmatic social science epistemology and methodology that can support those curricular ideas in educational policy discussions. He will identify resources for this philosophy and practice of social science praxis in the work of Peirce, James, Addams, Dewey, and contemporary educational researchers.

Presenters: Ryan Musgrave (Rollins College), Jerry Rosiek (University of Oregon), Doug Anderson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)

Re-reading William James: Talks to Teachers

In this trio of sessions, we will be considering James?s neglected 1899 volume, Talks to Teachers on Psychology, and to Students on Some of Life?s Ideals.  Our intention in this return to Talks will be to reconsider both its content and its place in the James corpus.  From its introductory psychology to its great moral essays, this volume presents James at his philosophical clearest.  Still, it has never managed to earn a place among James?s masterpieces.  We will be attempting to overcome this received impression, by pointing to themes that deserve further consideration and by following threads to James?s other works.  The first session will be devoted primarily to psychological themes; the second, to educational; and the third, to ethical. 

Presenters: Jim Campbell (University of Toledo), Lee McBride (College of Wooster), Tadd Ruetenik (St. Ambrose University), and Jennifer Welchman (University of Alberta).

 Aesthetics

That art has a cognitive dimension is well known to artists and aestheticians, though there is disagreement about what that means and how extensively it defines art. Using Justus Buchler?s theory of judgment, in the first session, we will explore the ways in which art is or can be cognitive, and what a naturalist epistemology might look like if it takes the cognitive dimension of art seriously.  In the second session, we will explore alternatives to the dominant analytic paradigms of meaning, especially as they have been employed in discussions of art production and appreciation found in Peirce, Dewey, Danto, Shusterman and Buchler. In the third session, we will distinguish at least seven types of ?Abstract Art.? The aim will be to demonstrate how images that are superficially similar, such as those comprising ?Geometric Abstraction,? often register quite different types of perceptual experience. A basic assumption of our approach will be that while the visual arts are grounded in perceptual experience, they nevertheless also produce cognitive knowledge as well as diverse sites for locating meaning.

Presenters: David Craven (University of New Mexico), Armen Marsoobian(Southern Connecticut State University), and John Ryder (State University of New York)

American Feminism

Women?s issues and women philosophers have long been a part of the American intellectual landscape.  This seminar will discuss the American philosophical tradition and the place of feminism in it, both through an overview of feminist philosophers and an examination of the work of particular philosophers.  Individual philosophers considered will include Jane Addams, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ella Lyman Cabot, Mary Parker Follett, and recent feminist philosophers including Lorraine Code, Karen Barad, and Charlene Haddock Seigfried.  The seminar will consist of three sessions.  The first will be a panel discussion on feminism in the American tradition followed by an introduction to the works of Gilman, Cabot, and Follett.  The second session will examine particular texts of the three women to introduce a range of promising work that is often left out of discussions of American philosophy in the first half of the 20th century.  The final session will be a panel discussion on recent work in feminist philosophy, how it connects with the commitments of earlier feminist pragmatists, and its potential for further development in response to the problems of the 21st century. 

Presenters: Charlene Haddock Seigfried (Purdue University), John Kaag (University of Massachusetts?Lowell), Erin McKenna (Pacific Lutheran University), and Scott L. Pratt (University of Oregon).
Call for Abstracts:  Works-In-Progress : This year?s program will include several one-hour "Works-in-Progress" sessions, at which interested persons may present their current research projects, especially books, and receive critical feedback from Institute attendees.  Those wishing to present their work should submit, by May 22, a 150-to-300-word abstract to Scott L. Pratt by email at spratt@uoregon.edu. Submitted abstracts will be blind reviewed and authors of accepted abstracts will be added to the Institute program. 

There will also be a dissertation workshop at which graduate students, at any stage in the process of writing their dissertations, will present brief summaries of their work and receive feedback from Institute attendees. Graduate students interested in presenting their projects should submit a 150-300 word abstract to Scott L. Pratt by email at spratt@uoregon.edu by May 22.  Authors of projects received by May 22 will also be added to the final Institute program.



2008 Institute, Boulder, CO

CU Boulder

  • July 7-12, 2008, Boulder, CO.
    The 11th Annual Summer Institute of American Philosophy met July 7-12, 2008, at the University of Colorado, Boulder. As at past Institutes, leading scholars in various aspects of American philosophy were invited to present seminars on their recent or current work.
  • Registration Form (including housing) -- .doc file (HERE)
  • Program for 2008 Summer Institute available ( HERE)
  • Flyer (and list of presenters) for 2008 Summer Institute available here (HERE)

    Confirmed participants include: (last update, June 12, 2008)

    Mitchell Aboulafia (The Juilliard School), ?George Herbert Mead and the Dilemmas of Cosmopolitanism.?
    Randall Auxier (Southern Illinois University, Carbondale), ?Reading Royce as a Whole.?
    Roberto Frega (Alma Mater Bologna University, Italy), "A Pragmatist Theory of Public Reason."
    Robert Innis (University of Massachusetts, Lowell), ?Susanne Langer:  The Symbolic Mind.?
    Judith Green (Fordham University), "Pragmatism and Social Hope:  Rorty, Dewey, and Deepening Democracy."
    Alison Jaggar (University of Colorado, Boulder), "Abortion Rights and Gender Justice Worldwide."
    Bill E. Lawson (University of Memphis), ?Booker T. Washington in the 21st Century.?
    Arthur Lothstein (Long Island University), "Ralph Waldo Emerson."
    Joseph Margolis (Temple U.), "Pragmatism, Continental, and Analytic Philosophy:  Toward a Rapprochement."
    Phillip McReynolds (Penn State University), Documentary video:  ?American Philosopher.?
    Robert Neville (Boston University), ?The Axiology of Thinking.?
    Nicholas Rescher (University of Pittsburgh), "The Fragmentation of American Philosophy."
    Sandra Rosenthal (Loyola University, New Orleans), "The Importance of C.I. Lewis for the Pragmatic Tradition."
    Crispin Sartwell (Dickinson College), ?Entanglements:  A System of (American) Philosophy.
    Roger Ward (Georgetown College), "Jonathan Edwards on Sin and Self-Knowledge"

    2008 Readings lists:


    Rescher
    (1)
    Auxier
    (Read: Intro, chs. 5-7)
    Neville
    (list is here)
    Aboulafia
    (list is here)
    Lothstein
    (1, also see list, here)
    Frega
    (1)
    Innis (1,2,3,4,5-optional)
    Sartwell (1, also a list is here)
    Margolis (1, 2, also see list, here)
    Lawson (1)
    Ward (1)
    Green (1-reading list, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
    Margolis (1 2 also see list, here)

    Notes about Reading Lists
    : (a)
    Numbers in parentheses link to actual readings. The phrase "list is here" typically links to just a list of the readings which participants need to gather and copy from local libraries, etc.
    (b) ALL QUESTIONS ABOUT READINGS SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO THE APPROPRIATE SESSION LEADER. EACH NAME ON THE READING LIST LINKS DIRECTLY TO THAT SEMINAR LEADER'S EMAIL ADDRESS.

Call for Abstracts
Again this year will be several one-hour "Works in Progress" sessions, at which interested persons may present their works-in-progress, especially books, and receive critical feedback from Institute attendees.Those wishing to present their work should submit, by May 1, a 150-to-300-word abstract to Ken Stikkers, either via e-mail, at kstikker@siu.edu or at: Department of Philosophy, Mailcode 4505, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901. Submitted abstracts will be blindly reviewed, and persons submitting them will be notified as soon as possible.
Also, there will again be sessions on "Dissertations in Progress," at which graduate students, at any stage in the process of writing their dissertations, present brief summaries of their work and receive valuable feedback from Institute attendees. Graduate students interested in presenting their work need not submit abstracts but should contact Ken Stikkers.
The Institute is co-sponsored by the Center for Dewey Studies, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, and the University of Colorado, Boulder and Denver.



2007 Institute, Boulder, CO

2007 Institute: July 9-14, 2007, Boulder, CO.

The Summer Institute in American Philosophy seeks to provide a forum for more intensive and extensive discussion of American philosophy than is normally afforded by traditional conference formats.

The 10th Annual Summer Institute of American Philosophy will meet July 9-14, 2007, at the University of Colorado, Boulder. As at past Institutes, leading scholars in various aspects of American philosophy are invited to present seminars on their recent or current work. The list of seminars will be posted shortly. Also, there will again be sessions on "Dissertations in Progress," at which graduate students, at any stage in process of writing their dissertations, present brief summaries of their work and receive valuable feedback from Institute attendees. Graduate students interested in presenting their work should contact Ken Stikkers

Call for Abstracts

New this year will be several one-hour "Works in Progress" sessions, at which interested persons may present their works-in-progress, especially books, and receive critical feedback from Institute attendees. Those wishing to present their work should submit, by June 1, a 150-to-300-word abstract to Ken Stikkers, either via e-mail, at kstikker@siu.edu or at: Department of Philosophy, Mailcode 4505, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901. A panel of scholars will blindly review submitted abstracts, and persons submitting them will be notified as soon as possible.

The Institute is co-sponsored by the Center for Dewey Studies, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, and the University of Colorado, Boulder and Denver.

History: The Institute was originally conceived and planned by Larry Hickman, Director of the Center for Dewey Studies, and began at the University of Vermont in 1998 with a great attendance of both established scholars and students of American philosophy. John Lachs (Vanderbilt University) organized the Institute's second meeting, expanding its format. Instrumental in the success of the Vermont meetings was the organizing work of Tony Earls, presently at the University of Wyoming. In 2003 the Institute moved to the University of Oregon, where it was assisted by Scott Pratt and John Lysaker. Collaborating with Hickman and the Institute's local hosts in developing the Institute's programs are Kenneth Stikkers (Southern Illinois University) and Charlene Haddock Seigfried (Purdue University), who serves as SAAP''s liaison to the Institute. Beyond the scheduled meetings, the intimate setting for the conference, wherein participants dine together and socialize in the evenings, aims to enrich the seminar experience, as conversations spill over into the meals and evening hours and collegial friendships are formed and strengthened.

Questions?

Contact Ken Stikkers at kstikker@siu.edu or 618-536-6641.

Interested persons are encouraged to consult past programs of Institute to get a better sense of its structure and content. Click here to visit the archives of previous years' conference programs and details.

Comments about the Summer Institute in American Philosophy

"It was the most exciting professional experience of my life." (David Vessey, Beloit College)

"I had no idea how much fun the Summer Institute was." (Ann K. Clarke, St. Mary's University)

"I learned more about Whitehead in three days of discussion with Jude Jones than in three readings of Process and Reality; and it was more fun." (Doug Anderson, Pennsylvania State University)

"The Summer Institute is an inspiring experience. The diversity of speakers and topics, the supportive environment, and the opportunity to share ideas in a beautiful and historic setting make this the philosophical gathering that I most look forward to each year." (Heather Keith, Lyndon State College)

"I attended the Summer Institute in American Philosophy for the first time in the summer of 2000. It was one of those rare experiences where my best hopes were made real. The week was rich with discussion of issues and ideas I have little opportunity to share in elsewhere. The seminars were professionally run, with insightful, focused, and lively discussion. I was struck by the support everyone gave each other, by the openness with which ideas were given and received; I found myself in a community of thinkers I can gladly call home. The Summer institute is itself an instantiation of the best of American Philosophy. It presents one with an opportunity to learn in a caring atmosphere of top-notch philosophers; I shall continue to attend as long as I am able." (Paola Lortie)

"Just a short note of praise for the 2000 Summer Institute in American Philosophy. The quality and diversity of the program is impressive as is the quality of scholars in attendance. The informal interactions create easy and informative contact among all who attend. The location is wonderful and certainly facilitates interaction. Congratulations on yet another successful summer program." (Jim Garrison, Virginia Tech)

"I found the Classical American Institute genuinely stimulating for many reasons. The questions raised in my seminar truly developed my grasp of the topic and hopefully helped other participants. I found the other seminars I attended of high quality. The graduate students there showed genuine interest and searching questions. And overall the fun and camaraderie were great." (Frank Oppenheim, S.J., Xavier University)